pandemic

A year into pandemic, Milan fashion week stays virtual

Fashionistas will have to log on to soak up the glamour at Milan Fashion Week, which remains online a year after the coronavirus first swept into northern Italy. 



a person wearing a costume: Armani was forced to move its show at the February 2020 Milan Fashion Week behind closed doors as coronavirus took hold in nearby Codogno


© Andreas SOLARO
Armani was forced to move its show at the February 2020 Milan Fashion Week behind closed doors as coronavirus took hold in nearby Codogno

No sharply dressed crowds will attend the extravaganza’s opening on Wednesday: it’s virtual catwalk shows only, with the likes of Armani and Prada presenting new women’s collections for autumn and winter 2021-22.



Kim Jones posing for the camera: Celebrated British menswear designer Kim Jones is due to present his first ready-to-wear collection for Fendi


© STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN
Celebrated British menswear designer Kim Jones is due to present his first ready-to-wear collection for Fendi

The word “coronavirus” was just starting to pop up in conversations among members of the global style elite as they gathered for the February 2020 edition of Milan Fashion Week.

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Italy’s first outbreak was taking hold in Codogno, an hour’s drive

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Motivated by community, these Black-owned business have grown in the pandemic

By relying on community support and faith and fighting for representation, three Black business owners showed how to survive against the odds.

While many businesses were forced to close their doors permanently due to COVID-19, these three owners actually opened their businesses amid the pandemic — and have seen the businesses grow.

“I was set to open in March to honor my mom’s birthday but ended up delaying the opening because of the pandemic,” said Rodesia Scott of Lynn’s Beauty Depot, a beauty supply store in Desoto, Texas.

Scott said she decided to hold her grand opening during the Juneteenth weekend, a holiday celebrating the end of slavery, because the event is widely celebrated across Texas.

In the heart of a historically black neighborhood in Charlotte, North Carolina, sits Leah and Louise, a juke joint. The Southern-inspired restaurant opened in March, just days before North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper announced

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Gov. Abbott praises DeSoto beauty supply store owner for opening and helping other small businesses during pandemic

Lynn’s Beauty Depot opened during the pandemic. Gov. Abbott described the small Black-owned business as a lifeline to other entrepreneurs.

DESOTO, Texas — A new beauty supply shop in North Texas is getting recognized for its owner’s determination and decision to open during the pandemic. 

Lynn’s Beauty Depot opened at 1488 N. Hampton Road in Desoto in June 2020. It’s the first Black-owned, veteran-owned and woman-owned beauty supply store in the city. 

“We took a huge chance,” said owner Rodesia Scott.

Scott, a U.S. Navy veteran, said she took a risk opening a business during a time when coronavirus was forcing other shops to close. 

Governor Gregg Abbott and his team heard about the entrepreneur’s efforts.

“Rodesia opened a brick and mortar beauty supply store in the middle of a pandemic,” said Abbott. 

The governor highlighted Scott and other Texans during his State of the State address this week. 

“She

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How these entrepreneurs are adapting to a pandemic

From bookstore shopkeepers to cafe owners to disc jockeys, entrepreneurs across America have been among the hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic.

Small businesses in the U.S. employ nearly 60 million people, and 57 million are self-employed independent contractors, gig workers, temporary and part-time workers. Benefits like health care coverage or sick paid leave are not guaranteed for all of these workers and many rely on their income to handle these expenses.

With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines to limit the social gatherings and local governments mandating the closure of nonessential businesses to help curb the spread of COVID-19, these business owners have a major challenge: Find creative ways to adjust in a time of crisis.

Here are seven entrepreneurs who are innovating and reinventing their businesses during the coronavirus pandemic.

A bookstore all to yourself

Capital Hill Books, forced to close during the coronavirus, had come up with two ways to help it maintain business during the shutdown: shopping by appointment (four shoppers or less) and virtual grab bag book collections shipped to shoppers.
Capital Hill Books, forced to close during the coronavirus, had come
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